The novel-after feeling

14 Apr
loss and gain

A philosophical novel written after Newman’s conversion to Roman Catholicism

Yesterday I finished reading Loss and Gain by Henry Newman, and as I write this, I have just finished Prince Caspian. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t just read books, but Lewis’ book is an afternoon read. In fact, it is a children’s book. After all the theological dose in Loss and Gain, I needed something light.

But I am more or less in the same frame of mind as after I finished Loss and Gain. Time seems to stand still. After reading the last page, I find myself thrown rudely into reality. (This happens to me after every book I read). My head kind of throbs. I need  time to take in the fact that now I am in the real world and that the book characters and all that happened is imaginary. It is almost the same kind of feeling as the end of a movie, seeing the credits with nice music, and then bang!, someone switches on the lights and you stare at the blue screen in shock and disbelief.

What to do? Go on with life? Get another book to immerse oneself in? Wouldn’t it  be nice if there was no TIME? I mean, we could enjoy a good book forever? It sounds like a joke, I know. But I don’t know what to do about my throbbing head.

Anyone got ideas?

The last chronicle of Barset

12 Apr

149789This is the last of the Barsetshire tales. It is so hard to keep flipping the pages knowing that at some point, one will flip for the last time. Many of the characters are already familiar: The archdeacon and his family, the bishop of Barchester and his wife Mrs. Proudie, the humble abode of the perpetual curate at Hogglestock, the Framleys etc. The clergy of the Church of England is Trollope’s specialization.

The story centres on the alleged theft of a cheque of £20, by none other than the Rev. Josiah Crawley. Everyone is keen to unravel or take advantage of the mystery. Old family rivalries are renewed, friendships are strengthened, and lovers find comfort in each other and hope for the best. It is indeed a trying courtship between Major Grantly, whose sister married a Lord and Grace Crawley, whose father has been accused of stealing the cheque of £20.

John Eames, who we left heartbroken in The small house at Allington for his unsuccessful bid for Lily Dale, makes a final effort to win the lady of his dreams. I must admit that I expected things to go differently. Why can’t Lily learn to forget the past i.e. to forget Adolphus Crosbie’s jilt and agree to live her life and not dwell on what could have been?

As for Crawley, how sweetly the reader relishes his triumph on Mrs. Proudie. She is absolutely domineering, she is the bishop. But here comes a pauper, almost disgraced in the face of men, who is able to tell to her face what everyone thought about her all along! The ending in this regard is no surprise, but it is dramatic.

antt

Anthony Trollope (1815-1882)

Anthony Trollope had this to say about the book:

I regard this as the best novel I have written. I was never quite satisfied with the development of the plot, which consisted in the loss of a cheque, of a charge made against a clergyman for stealing it, and of absolute uncertainty on the part of the clergyman himself as to the manner in which the cheque found its way into his hands…. I have never been capable of constructing with complete success the intricacies of a plot that required to be unraveled.I agree it is well written. I could hardly keep down the book. Both Trollope and some of his later critics have considered The Last Chronicle to be his greatest novel. I am no literary critic, but among his books, I like Doctor Thorne best.

Are there any Trollope fans out there?

Review: The picture of Dorian Gray

10 Apr

5297 When I finished reading the book I thought: Did I just read a book about ugliness? Did I just read a book about inner ugliness, which is worse? I felt like throwing up. The question I asked myself, and I still do is: why was this book written?

Dorian Gray is a beautiful fashionable young man whose is idolized by his friend Basil, a painter. Through Basil, Dorian gets to meet Lord Henry, a fact that Basil regrets bitterly. The book is all about Lord Henry’s influence on Dorian who ultimately “sells” his soul for eternal youth and beauty.

The picture of Dorian Gray was obviously written for a purpose. In fact, it is Oscar Wilde’s only novel. Much can be said about it in the literary sense: themes of beauty, art, friendship; symbols such as the painting and the yellow book etc. Much has been said about its connection with the author’s life. I wonder if I am not making things worse be still saying something about it.

Try as I can, it is difficult to forget the book. There are the almost hypnotizing phrases that issue from Lord Henry’s mouth that leave one dumbfounded. True, Lord Henry is Dorian’s corrupter, but it is amazing to see Wilde’s argument put so beautifully together. Lord Henry manages to convince him to live his life according to his maxim of pleasure, pursuit of art etc.

As Dorian goes from bad to worse, there is almost no hope for him. The reader would like to stop reading; the stench of foul things is perhaps too much to bear. It seems as though the book is a glorification of the pursuit of pleasure at whatever cost.

However, I don’t think that that is the reason for the book. In the last chapter, there is this sentence: It was his beauty that had ruined him, his beauty and the youth that he had prayed for. But for those two things, his life might have been free from stain. His beauty had been to him but a mask, his youth but a mockery. What was youth at best? A green, an unripe time, a time of shallow moods, and sickly thoughts. Why had he worn its livery? Youth had spoiled him.

Youth. A mystery. A gift. A curse perhaps? Each one makes it what they would. But as far as the book is concerned, I can breathe easily. The sentence quoted above restored the hope that I had almost lost.

Review: Callista by John Henry Newman

8 Apr

4635826This is one of the books that I would re-read any time of the year. Set in Proconsular Africa, it tells the story of third century Christians. It revolves around three characters: Callista, a Greek decorator of sculptures, Agellius, a farmer and a Christian and Caecilius, the persecuted bishop of Carthage. It tells of the clash between paganism and Christianity.

Callista, unsatisfied with an empty life and with the pagan culture surrounding her, seeks for the truth. She is attracted by the beauty of Christianity, but considers it too good to be real. Agellius tries to woo her, but Callista sees his real motive: he takes advantage of her curiosity of his religion to gain her for himself rather than for his God. Juba, Agellius’ brother is scornful of his Christianity and together with his uncle, tries to make Agellius “come back to his senses”.

A chain of events then follows: the plague of locusts that leave the city of Sicca devastated, the possession of Juba, the arrest of Callista on the charge of Christianity and the implementation of the edict of the Emperor Decius regarding the Christians: christianos ad leones (Christians to the lions). Will Callista be set free or will she be killed, even though she is not a Christian? Will she convert before it is too late, and if so, who will help her? All this drama waits for the reader.

The review in Goodreads says: Far from being tied to the past, Newman’s novel challenges the assumptions of the modern reader in unexpected ways. More perhaps than his major works, Newman’s fiction reveals the contours of his imaginative life, the range and power of his prose writing, and the wider literary culture which he so often subordinated to his higher vocation or the demands of controversy. Callista’s picture of the Christian venture of faith, so close to Newman’s own, and the setting in his beloved church of the Fathers in Roman North Africa, make it one of his most characteristic works. Callista is an important text for understanding Newman’s lifelong vocation as a Christian apologist, and the importance for him of the early Church.

Kindling the reading mania

3 Apr

Once upon a time, so long that I can’t possibly remember, there lived a little African girl who loved books. Somewhat timid, she loved the hours spent in the company of her books. Whenever she could spare a little time from her chores, she wrote her thoughts down in a blog. Now, this girl was like an English aristocrat for her sticking to the old time-tested customs. She staunchly believed, for example, that books could only be read in the paper format.

Until she discovered Kindle.

Before she could say Jack Robinson, she was hooked. Kindle became to her like an irresistible magnet that devoured all the reading time she had. Well, sometimes she also used other time that was not reading time to read, but that is another matter. She fancied that she loved reading, but kindle just re-kindled her favourite pastime.

Pride and Prejudice, The Three Musketeers, Little Women, Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, Wives and Daughters, A Christmas Carol, Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Small House at Allington and so on and so forth. All that in a few months! It is no wonder that she doesn’t have time to jot down her thoughts nowadays. She is too busy learning French and reading, of course on Kindle.

Kindle, c’est magnifique!

 

 

The small house at Allington

30 Mar

Anthony Trollope remains one of my favourite authors. The small house of Allington is the second to last of the Barchester series, and a good read. I like Barchester Towers and Doctor Thorne more, nevertheless, The small house at Allington has been satisfactory. Published in 1862, it came out in book format two years later.

I particularly like the way it begins: “Of course there was a Great House at Allington. How otherwise should there have been a Small House?” Mrs Dale and her daughters Lily and Bell live at the Small House. The squire, the girls’ childless uncle, lives at the Great House.

Lily Dale, on meeting Adolphus Crosbie, tells her sister Bell (Isabella) that he is a swell. He is a London man, who knows what to say to everyone, more apt to shine in a ballroom than in a tête-à-tête. Lily is dazzled, and Adolphus as well of her purity. By the time he discovers that she has no fortune, he is engaged to be married. Will he keep his word, even after spending the last week of his vacation in Courcy Castle, where the Lady Alexandrina is?

The coming of age of John Eames is so funny. John is a long time friend of the family, and the admirer of Lily. He has written thousands of poems in praise of her, of which she has not seen even one. Will his friendship with the earl of Allington help him extricate himself from Amelia Roper, whom he cannot tell to her face that he does not love her?

Adolphus Crosbie is an interesting character. He takes leave of his betrothed swearing that he will be true to her, but soon changes his mind before the week is out. Isn’t it ironical that on his wedding day, he finds himself thinking about Lily, even with the Lady Alexandrina by his side? Perhaps he deserved it. Perhaps he did not deserve Lily Dale. He loved and let go, because he preferred to live in poverty –with- the- appearance- of- wealth rather than abject poverty. Poor man! It is no wonder the last words of the author concern him:

“As for Adolphus, he had taken his little vessel bravely out into the deep waters, and had sailed her well while fortune stuck close to him. But he had forgotten his nautical rules, and success had made him idle. His plummet and lead had not been used, and he had kept no look-out ahead. Therefore the first rock he met shivered his bark to pieces. His wife, the Lady Alexandrina, is to be seen in the one-horse carriage with her mother at Baden-Baden.”

The reader gets the last laugh.

This book is a swell, and Anthony Trollope is one hell of a swell!

Little women by Louisa May Alcott

11 Dec

I’ve just finished reading Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. It was such a delight. The story is simple: four little girls growing up and finding their feet in the world. But such simple plot is told in such sweetness and truth that the reader wipes the tears that gather as he closes the last page.

Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March are as different as north is from south. Meg with her motherly instinct guards all the girls; Jo, a tomboy is always frolicking around with her friend Laurie and doing “larks”; Beth, always happy to be calm and to mind the others; and little Amy is the model of propriety. Even their talents are very diverse; Meg is a natural homemaker, Jo writes, Beth is sweetness itself and Amy plays and draws. Yet, they get on so well together, that it seems a miracle, until we discover their mother’s hand in the not so little miracle.

Grow up they must, and face the world, but only after facing their little battles within. They flourish beautifully, and their families at the end of the book are a real work of art. It is what I call a really GOOD story, in the real sense of the word and I thank the little Marches for such a delightful read. Truly, the story went straight to my heart, to be cherished forever!