Tag Archives: anthony trollope

The last chronicle of Barset

12 Apr

149789This is the last of the Barsetshire tales. It is so hard to keep flipping the pages knowing that at some point, one will flip for the last time. Many of the characters are already familiar: The archdeacon and his family, the bishop of Barchester and his wife Mrs. Proudie, the humble abode of the perpetual curate at Hogglestock, the Framleys etc. The clergy of the Church of England is Trollope’s specialization.

The story centres on the alleged theft of a cheque of £20, by none other than the Rev. Josiah Crawley. Everyone is keen to unravel or take advantage of the mystery. Old family rivalries are renewed, friendships are strengthened, and lovers find comfort in each other and hope for the best. It is indeed a trying courtship between Major Grantly, whose sister married a Lord and Grace Crawley, whose father has been accused of stealing the cheque of £20.

John Eames, who we left heartbroken in The small house at Allington for his unsuccessful bid for Lily Dale, makes a final effort to win the lady of his dreams. I must admit that I expected things to go differently. Why can’t Lily learn to forget the past i.e. to forget Adolphus Crosbie’s jilt and agree to live her life and not dwell on what could have been?

As for Crawley, how sweetly the reader relishes his triumph on Mrs. Proudie. She is absolutely domineering, she is the bishop. But here comes a pauper, almost disgraced in the face of men, who is able to tell to her face what everyone thought about her all along! The ending in this regard is no surprise, but it is dramatic.

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Anthony Trollope (1815-1882)

Anthony Trollope had this to say about the book:

I regard this as the best novel I have written. I was never quite satisfied with the development of the plot, which consisted in the loss of a cheque, of a charge made against a clergyman for stealing it, and of absolute uncertainty on the part of the clergyman himself as to the manner in which the cheque found its way into his hands…. I have never been capable of constructing with complete success the intricacies of a plot that required to be unraveled.I agree it is well written. I could hardly keep down the book. Both Trollope and some of his later critics have considered The Last Chronicle to be his greatest novel. I am no literary critic, but among his books, I like Doctor Thorne best.

Are there any Trollope fans out there?

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The small house at Allington

30 Mar

Anthony Trollope remains one of my favourite authors. The small house of Allington is the second to last of the Barchester series, and a good read. I like Barchester Towers and Doctor Thorne more, nevertheless, The small house at Allington has been satisfactory. Published in 1862, it came out in book format two years later.

I particularly like the way it begins: “Of course there was a Great House at Allington. How otherwise should there have been a Small House?” Mrs Dale and her daughters Lily and Bell live at the Small House. The squire, the girls’ childless uncle, lives at the Great House.

Lily Dale, on meeting Adolphus Crosbie, tells her sister Bell (Isabella) that he is a swell. He is a London man, who knows what to say to everyone, more apt to shine in a ballroom than in a tête-à-tête. Lily is dazzled, and Adolphus as well of her purity. By the time he discovers that she has no fortune, he is engaged to be married. Will he keep his word, even after spending the last week of his vacation in Courcy Castle, where the Lady Alexandrina is?

The coming of age of John Eames is so funny. John is a long time friend of the family, and the admirer of Lily. He has written thousands of poems in praise of her, of which she has not seen even one. Will his friendship with the earl of Allington help him extricate himself from Amelia Roper, whom he cannot tell to her face that he does not love her?

Adolphus Crosbie is an interesting character. He takes leave of his betrothed swearing that he will be true to her, but soon changes his mind before the week is out. Isn’t it ironical that on his wedding day, he finds himself thinking about Lily, even with the Lady Alexandrina by his side? Perhaps he deserved it. Perhaps he did not deserve Lily Dale. He loved and let go, because he preferred to live in poverty –with- the- appearance- of- wealth rather than abject poverty. Poor man! It is no wonder the last words of the author concern him:

“As for Adolphus, he had taken his little vessel bravely out into the deep waters, and had sailed her well while fortune stuck close to him. But he had forgotten his nautical rules, and success had made him idle. His plummet and lead had not been used, and he had kept no look-out ahead. Therefore the first rock he met shivered his bark to pieces. His wife, the Lady Alexandrina, is to be seen in the one-horse carriage with her mother at Baden-Baden.”

The reader gets the last laugh.

This book is a swell, and Anthony Trollope is one hell of a swell!